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"Casting Off" Book Review


Casting Off by P.I. Paris

"Casting Off" book cover

When the residents of a Highland care home discover that the new owners are about to substantially put up the fees, they know that dramatic action is called for. But what can a group of senior citizens possibly do against a big organisation? For Dorothy, the situation is serious. If she can t raise money she'll have to leave all her friends, like dear Miss Ross.

In protest, the residents barricade themselves into the lounge. However, their rebellion fails, so worldly-wise Joan suggests a most unusual way to cover the rise a very naughty chat line for men who want to talk to older women in a particular way ! As their lives take a series of unexpected turns, things get increasingly out of control ...

Casting Off is a hilarious, poignant tale of friendship, loyalty and sacrifice and how it s never too late to try something new.

5 stars!


So, where should I start? We bought this book at a stall in a small village somewhere near Tain. The author was there, selling the books and signing them for anyone who wanted to ask. If I had known then what a humorous, caring and clever man he was, I would surely have spent some time talking to him before moving onto the next stall. As always, a little piece of the author is embedded in their work and I think P.I. Paris would be a very interesting person to talk to.

I was absolutely thrilled with the book. Generally, I stay well clear of anything risqué (a bit like Miss Ross in the story) but it’s been sitting on the bookshelf for a few months begging me to read it. It was that perfect mix of humour and depth that I love in a book. Parts of the story had me laughing aloud (not something I often do with a book or film) while other parts were so heart wrenching, putting across an incredible strong moral undercurrent.

A major factor I look for in a book is the strength of its characters. By the end, I felt like I knew everyone, even those that only appeared once or twice. My criticism (my only criticism) is that one of the characters who appeared to be quite key to the story seemed to drift away towards the end. While personally, I would have liked her to be included in later parts of the story more, I can see that this really reflects life. Friends come and go and while they may not always be there in the whirlwind that is your own story, they’ll always remain friends. I don’t know if the author meant to put this point across but it ties in well to the book’s themes.

Overall, an incredible book that I struggled to put down.
Find it here.


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