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"Day's Dying Glory" Book Launch

11th April 2017

The Ropewalk

Barton upon Humber

North Lincolnshire


Rows of "Day's Dying Glory" from the initial print run.
Many thanks to Caroline Watson for the photo.


The first of anything is always a daunting experience. The first book launch for a story that has been years in the making, and embodying a little segment of our souls into each page, is a terrifying experience.

We’ve been planning the launch of Day’s Dying Glory by Virginia Crow for several months now so, when the time came to make it over to The Ropewalk in Barton-on-Humber on the 11th April, we weren’t really sure what to say.

The tension disappeared, however, when we arrived at The Ropery Hall and people started arriving. My sister, Judith, had surprised us by travelling down that day – all the way from the north of Scotland – to be with us on this momentous occasion. As more and more people arrived, some of whom I knew from when we lived in Lincolnshire, the atmosphere grew more and more enjoyable.

After I introduced the author, Virginia Crow read us some sections from her book. The readings were centred around the three main characters – sisters living initially in a Highland lodge. With clarity and sensitivity, Virginia led us through some events in her book.

For the event, 8 young people from the Duckegg TheatreCompany were performing 4 scenes from the book. Their acting was fabulous and it was stunning to see how they had interpreted the text. I enjoyed this, sitting back and appreciating all the hard work that had gone into this production.
The Duckegg Theatre Company performing a battle scene!


There was also a quiz with 15 questions – all about the era in which the book is set. The questions were difficult and the winners got 10 of the questions right. After the Orkney book launch on the 6th May, I will post this quiz online and see if anyone on here can answer the questions!
A beautiful (and DELICIOUS!) cake by Linda Lawcock.
Thanks again to Caroline Watson for the photo.

It was disappointing when the evening came to an end, but we all had a slice of cake which Linda Lawcock had made for us (see Cakes by Linda on Facebook) and Virginia signed the books that people had bought. Overall, it was a wonderful evening and a fabulous start to what I hope will be a successful book launch campaign.
Thank you to Caroline Watson who took these fabulous photos from the Barton Book Launch!


17th April 2017

Innerpeffray Library

Innerpeffray

Crieff



The Library at Innerpeffray made a lovely setting for the Perthshire launch of Day’s Dying Glory. The room was not too big, giving it a personal feel as we sat around listening to readings from the author and asking any questions that popped into our heads.

The readings chosen were centred around significant characters: Major Tenterchilt, Hamish and the three sisters – Arabella, Imogen and Catherine. The book launch event was focussed on the book’s characters and many of the questions reflected this. (When pushed, Virginia Crow claims her favourite character is Mr Dermot, the family lawyer).
Virginia Crow with "Day's Dying Glory" at Innerpeffray Library


Once the readings and questions had finished, the guests were invited to take a look at some of the favours on offer (seeds, soap, bookworms!), and given an opportunity to buy a book and have it signed. This they did, with excitement! Signing books also gave Virginia a chance to have a better chat with them about the book, and about their own reading preferences.

A local businesswoman from Caithness, Tartan at Heart, had made a Day’s Dying Glory range of keyrings, bookmarks and brooches. All of these items used the Gordon dress tartan, as some of the key characters in the book are from the Gordon clan. The items were priced competitively and looked beautiful.
One of the items from Tartan at Heart's "Day's Dying Glory" range!

The venue itself was perfect for such a day. The oldest lending library in Scotland, Innerpeffray Library, is set in a secluded rural location, with tall windows looking out onto the stream. The garden around are beautiful and the air smelt so Spring-like.

We could handle some of the books which, for me, was quite a special experience. We love books…we always have…but to handle something that had been used by generations and generations of families was so exhilarating. The book I held was an old pocket book, with a vellum cover which had lasted surprisingly well.

As we drove away, sad to leave such a place, we discussed how different it was to the Lincolnshire Book Launch, but how equally memorable and special it had been.

Virginia Crow in the Library. Innerpeffray is a beautiful library,
steeped in history and a sincere love of books.

Buy your kindle copy of Day's Dying Glory here, for only 99p!

Comments

  1. Great blog - really sets the scenes - and demonstrates some of the planning involved to get the message about Day's Dying Glory out there. Also encourages a re-reading of this 21st century novel which is capable of taking one right back to the early 19th. Top blog and most impressive first novel.

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