Skip to main content

Posts

"Dear Mr Pop Star" by Derek & Dave Philpott

For more than a decade, Derek Philpott and his son, Dave, have been writing to pop stars from the 1960s to the 90s to take issue with the lyrics of some of their best-known songs.
But then, to their great surprise, the pop stars started writing back...
Dear Mr Pop Star contains 100 of Derek and Dave's greatest hits, including correspondence with Katrina and the Waves, Tears for Fears, Squeeze, The Housemartins, Suzi Quatro, Devo, Deep Purple, Nik Kershaw, T Pau, Human League, Eurythmics, Wang Chung, EMF, Mott the Hoople, Heaven 17, Jesus Jones, Johnny Hates Jazz, Carter the Unstoppable Sex Machine, Chesney Hawkes and many, many more.

When I agreed to review this book and be part of the blog tour for the launch, I wasn't entirely sure what to expect. This book's subject and way of writing is most unusual...but it works!
What a great hobby to write to celebrities, and greater still that some of them would reply, often matching the cheek and wit that was initially sent to them.…
Recent posts

"The Cunning Woman's Cup"

"When Alice McCleish’s gardener Brian unearths an object of great archaeological significance deep under the compost heap it is not only Alice who is affected. Her friendship with Margaret Allerton, retired Professor of Anthropology, as well as Alice's family, friends and neighbours are all touched. 


Alice and Margaret find themselves questioning long-held beliefs about the material and spiritual world that surrounds them. Both women find their lives transformed unalterably by their newfound companionship. Serendipity puts Alice’s nearest neighbour, the troubled Violet Turnbull, in touch with the enigmatic Avian Tyler, whose mystical ‘gift’ offers Violet a promise of liberation.


All the while an echoing voice from long, long ago hints at the history of the locality dominated by the standing stone circle that bestrides the skyline above the small community of Duddo. This harrowing story reveals the provenance of the artefacts found beneath that compost heap."




Amazon tells me…

"Stone Circle" by Kate Murdoch

I logged on to the Crowvus Team email for the first time in a few days. After being accepted to join the Indie Reviewer's List, I have received many, many more book review requests so I thought I ought to get down my reading list...



"Stone Circle" by Kate Murdoch




"Is the Ability to Read Minds a Blessing or a Curse?
When Antonius’s father dies, he must work to support his family. He finds employment as a servant in the Palazzo Ducal, home of Conte Valperga. Sixteenth-century Pesaro is a society governed by status and Antonius has limited opportunities.When a competition is announced, Antonius seizes his chance. The winner will be apprenticed to the town seer. Antonius shares first place with his employer’s son.
The two men compete for their mentor’s approval. As their knowledge of magic and alchemy grows, so does the rivalry and animosity between them. When the love of a beautiful woman is at stake, Antonius must find a way to follow his heart and navigate his future.&qu…

"Childish Spirits" Book Review

"Childish Spirits" by Rob Keeley
"When Ellie and her family move into Inchwood Manor, Ellie quickly discovers strange things are happening. Who is the mysterious boy at the window? What secrets lie within the abandoned nursery? Who is the woman who haunts Ellie's dreams - and why has she returned to the Manor, after more than a century? Ellie finds herself entangled in a Victorian mystery of ghosts and tunnels and secret documents - and discovers that life all those years ago isn't so different from the world she knows today...Rob Keeley's first novel for children brings out all the ingredients of the classic ghost story within a recognisable modern world setting. Readers of his short story collections for children will find in Childish Spirits the elements which made his past books such a success - strong and contemporary characters, inventive twists on traditional themes, and a winning combination of action, suspense and humour."
Available from Amazon…

"Vincent" Book Review

"Vincent" by Jonathan G. Meyer

"On a remote Caribbean island, far from the eyes of the world, a battle will be waged.A small group of ordinary people fight to prevent the destruction of our planet, from a device meant to be the savior of another. Used on Earth, in a methodical way, the alien machine will cause irreversible harm.
Four unlikely heroes: a homeless man, a museum guide, a refugee, and an alien spacecraft will battle against the powerful forces of money, politics, and nature.
If the ship's recruits fail the mission, two worlds will face unnecessary hardship -- and an accelerated loss of life.
The future of both worlds rests in their hands."
This book is available here.

I've not read much Science Fiction. I don't know why because, whenever I delve into the genre, I really quite enjoy it. I love watching Sci-fi films and, when I read any book, I enjoy watching it as a movie in my head. I'm sure most people do this with a good book.
I enjoyed r…

John o' Groats Book Festival

What a weekend it has been! The 1st John o' Groats Book Festival has been in the pipeline for a long time, and it certainly lived up to expectations.

It started with a bang on Friday. A cartographer was launching her new set of Northern Scotland maps. Sadly, I was at work during this event but I've heard great things about it from people who were there. The cartographer's name is Val Fry and the publisher is Nicolson.

The first event I could attend was on the Friday evening when the authors were introduced, including 8 fabulous local authors who each had a 10 minute slot. It was great to see one of the organisers, Ian Leith, start the evening by showing his books.

The next author was Virginia Crow, published by Crowvus, who started her talk by showing the Day's Dying Glory book trailer which had people sitting on the edge of their seats.

It was super to hear so many local authors talk about their books, and read a passage or two. The authors included:
Dorothy Stewart (…

"Living with Depression" Book Review

Living with Depression by Nick Weatherhogg

Blurb from Goodreads:
"It has been estimated that almost one in ten adults and teenagers in the United Kingdom are affected by some form of depressive illness. This is a ten-fold increase in the last seventy years. If this growth were to continue unchecked, then about 95 percent of the population would have depression by the year 2100. It is further believed that depression will be the number 1 health problem worldwide by the year 2030. And yet for every three sufferers, less than 5 is spent each year on research. At least a half of all sufferers never seek any form of medical or psychiatric intervention.

The origin of depression can be situational or biochemical or a combination of many different factors. People do not choose to become depressed, but they do choose how they are going to deal with it and what they will do. A range of treatments are available as standard, ranging from medication to talking therapies, but various treatments…